Summary of Discussions with Teachers over management of ICT

How to manage the one computer classroom - how can you maximise its use?
  • Roster system - pegs moving down names, stopwatch/ timer
  • Previous child taps next person
  • An activity that finishes - they can show the next person
  • Expert - driver + passenger
  • Rotation stations
  • Use of data project for modeling
  • Use of ICT skills across the curriculum
  • Timetable - allocated timeslot
  • Use a timer
  • Have systems for waiting/ had a turn eg charts they tick, pegs that move down names, icecream sticks with names that get moved from a 'waiting' container to a 'had a turn' container.
  • You could have turns based around reading/ maths groups.
  • Use meaningful activities
  • Children use headphones so other children aren't distracted.
  • Whole class structure and guidelines for use of computer time.
  • Have visual prompts to aid the children by the computer. eg pictorial step-by-step guides on how to use a piece of software.
  • Send kids around other classes
  • Buy more computers on TradeMe (like Nigel does!)
  • Use kids as experts to teach other kids.
  • Have longer time frame to complete tasks or shorter tasks.
  • Have cooperative groups/ buddies on computer
  • Not every child has to do every activity.
  • Use learning logs and cycle through children so all have a turn.
  • Have children own their own flash drives to move files.
  • Children have a checklist to help monitor what they are doing on the computer.
How can you enhance your literacy programme using ICT? How can you manage this?
  • Online books - pm programme, big books, CD Rom
  • Data projector (shared writing)
  • Photos - writing a story together
  • PhotoStory - digital stories.
  • Interactive websites such as Starfall and Read Write Think
  • Podcasts
  • Kidpix slideshow stories - recording voices and letter practice
  • Kidspiration, Mindmapping
  • VoiceThread.com
  • Collaborative writing and editing with Google Docs
  • Reading Comprehension Strategies - Into the Book
Management Tips for Working in a Pod or Suite
  • Set up the space well and think about issues such as needing power points etc
  • If possible, have two adults - 1 helper and 1 instructor
  • Be very prepared - be clear on what you want them to achieve by the end of the lesson.
  • Have a senior buddy to set them up.
  • Use plastic cups - a student who is having trouble puts the cup on top of the computer and waits for a teacher.
  • Turn screen (not computer) off when teaching is going on.
  • Breaking teaching into manageable chunks and not expecting them to remember everything at once.
  • Buddies
  • Teach a skill, practise, then come back to mat space and repeat
  • Have a school timetable
  • Children paired/ shared
  • Blank booking form for pod
  • Have a buddy classroom to support programme
  • Be flexible with your class timetable
  • Have one group in the class using the pod while other children do other activities.
  • Make sure that classes have shared areas to save work to and that these are set up well beforehand and all children know how to get to these.
  • Check beforehand that the equipment is all there (cables etc) and available to use (eg charged!)
How can ICT provide evidence of children's learning? How can ICT aid reporting to parents?
  • Can make it more accessible to parents as well as children.
  • It can provide assessment data eg eTap
  • Use as a digital porfolio
  • Blogs
  • Podcasts, emails - can all be accessed from anywhere
  • Photos as examples of what children have learned
  • Movies
  • Examples on class pages
  • Online newsletters
Skills vs Context. When is it appropriate to focus on skills? Can this be done through authentic contexts?
  • On one side of the debate, some feel we have to start with skills first and introduce 2-3 key skills at a time and then concentrate on transferring into the curriculum context. If the children have the skills they will feel rewarded by what they learn later on. This is similar to learning punctuation through drilling and practise exercises.
  • On the other side of the debate, others feel that children will learn if skills are relevant at the time and should be learned as they need them. This is similar to learning to use punctuation through contexts such as writing.
  • A combination approach could be doing skill sessions as needs arise in order to use for curriculum. This is similar to noticing that children aren't punctuation correctly and doing some drills and then setting clear expectations that this learning will be demonstrated in their writing they do directly afterwards.
  • With younger children basic skills for using ICT are a definite and contexts can be found to support this eg paint for mouse control/ drag 'n' drop
  • Use of digital camera for photos of friends/ teachers etc
  • Determine the skill and then the context or vice versa but not one without the other
  • Whole school matrix progression so different levels can see what has gone B4
  • Is 'playing' an authentic use of your time? We think so - it is exploring and learning skills and knowledge
  • Independent activities to practice skills
  • There are some skills that children need to know before they can access products to use for authentic context projects.
  • Skills not used/ practised are forgotten.
  • Meet kids needs as they arrive.
  • Kids need to see a purpose for the skill.
  • It can be good to cover some general skills that cover a lot of different programs.
  • Some of these general skills could be typing, internet safety, and file management.
  • Don't focus on bells and whistles - think about the content.
  • Enough skill base so that they can use the skills in a practical scenario
  • Can't always do this in context
  • Needs to be taught just before it is needed for an authentic activity or it is forgotten.
  • If they are in context, they become more concrete for the children. They can see 'why' they need to know it.
  • Things like keyboarding can be taught 'just in case' as it is a skill needed across a wide range of ICT applications.
  • Some skills have a logical sequence and may need to be taught first so that you can continue building on skill base.
How do you plan for ICT? Do you start from the curriculum or the needs of the children?
  • Start from both! Curriculum for the context of the learning and needs for the content of the learning.
  • Probably start with topic - choose something that fits and teach skills (although we have a "sort of" school-wide progression.
  • Start with topic and match needs
  • Depends on software availability.
  • Start with needs for reading, writing and maths.
  • Child centred - keep to their needs. Start with the topic question as a context to meet needs.
  • Children's needs should be the centre of education: school plan, curriculum, professional development, and software/ ICT.
  • Start from the curriculum in school plan and tie into the current topic and then work out how to meet the needs of the children within this context.
  • Adapt the programme to the needs of the children.
  • Combine the curriculum with the needs of children.
How do you ensure the use of computers is not just 'busy' work? How do you monitor this?
  • Make specific learning intentions clear - articulate these, develop these with the children, encourage self-reflection by the children on these intentions.
  • Have set rules that children are all clear on when using the computers.
  • Ensure that tasks are well integrated.
  • Teacher or Student experts to model how to use the ICT otherwise the children will muck around if they are unsure of what to do.
  • Be well planned and have reviewed appropriate resources/ sites
  • Use ICT as a tool as part of the curriculum rather than a stand alone.
  • Tie it in with your current inquiry topic.
  • Having an authentic context for the work.
  • Be responsive to student questions - don't place limits on them.
  • Provide high expectations/ models of where you can go and what you can do with ICT.
  • Allow the kids to be experts (teacher doesn't always have to know more)
  • Have an awareness of what is out there.
  • Know your students and what their needs are.
  • Find user-friendly apps that help children focus on the content not the look/ format.
  • Have a definite purpose in mind for using ICT
  • Tell children what the outcome will be of the session and get them to figure out which tool to use to get there.
  • Include activities that encourage processing skills, problem solving, questioning, creativity.
  • As a school plan different skills for each year group.
  • Model the task.
  • Plan for some time to do the "how to" so they can spend the bulk of the time on the activity rather than being lost and unsure.
  • Use tasks that align with thinking tools such as Habits of the Mind or Thinkers Keys
  • Have clear learning intentions for the task.